110 miles, 53 hours: Questions for Diana Nyad

evmoevmo San FranciscoAdmin
edited September 2013 in General Discussion
Splitting these off, out of respect for @MvG's sentiment.

This discussion was created from comments split from:
- Diana Nyad's epic swim
- Here we go again...
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Comments

  • IF Diana Nyad swam from Cuba to Florida unassisted, with the jelly costume and face mask being the only deviation from traditional channel rules, then it should be celebrated as one of the world's greatest endurance feats.

    I don't think a little skepticism about the current swim is unfair or mean, given the dubious circumstances and reporting of her previous swims.

    Assuming she finishes, I hope she and her team will make completely clear what, exactly, has been accomplished. Did she swim the whole way? Did she ever rest on the boat? Was she ever towed by the boat? How does she account for the unusually fast progress she made, seemingly far in excess of her personal swim speed?

    Then the marathon swimming community can evaluate the claims and the evidence, and decide whether we believe her.
    Theodore
  • A post from Janet Hinkle, Independent Observer...

    "As an "official" observer, it's my job, along with co-observe Roger McVeigh, to make sure Diana obey's rules associated with this competitive swim. Her handlers can feed her, rub chafing cream on her shoulders, apply sunscreen to her lips, and make sure she has enough water to stay hydrated. What is strictly taboo is giving her any assistance with making progress on the swim - hanging on boats, etc. It's a rule that everyone takes seriously - Diana in particular."

    "As an observer it's my job to take notes on the progress of the trip. I get most of my information from navigator John Bartlett. Wind direction, boat speed, course changes, Diana's feeding breaks, any significant event are all a part of the log I am keeping."

    http://www.diananyad.com/blog/you-dont-say
  • evmoevmo San FranciscoAdmin
    Who are Janet Hinkle and Roger McVeigh?
  • mrfinbarrmrfinbarr Charter Member
    I am in awe of what Diana has achieved!

    I have had a look on her website & I can't find any set of rules. I really want her to address this issue, what she has done is huge but I want to fully know what she has actually achieved. Unfortunately she stand on her own reputation.
  • evmoevmo San FranciscoAdmin
    edited September 2013
    One big clarification I'm hoping to see is: Did she swim the whole way without physical assistance?

    Happy to give Diana all due credit and acclaim, as soon as I know what I'm giving credit for. This is one reason it's better to publish the rules ahead of time rather than after the fact, and use observers that are known and trusted by the community.
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    RuffWater said:

    A post from Janet Hinkle, Independent Observer...

    "As an "official" observer, it's my job, along with co-observe Roger McVeigh, to make sure Diana obey's rules associated with this competitive swim. Her handlers can feed her, rub chafing cream on her shoulders, apply sunscreen to her lips, and make sure she has enough water to stay hydrated. What is strictly taboo is giving her any assistance with making progress on the swim - hanging on boats, etc. It's a rule that everyone takes seriously - Diana in particular."

    "As an observer it's my job to take notes on the progress of the trip. I get most of my information from navigator John Bartlett. Wind direction, boat speed, course changes, Diana's feeding breaks, any significant event are all a part of the log I am keeping."

    http://www.diananyad.com/blog/you-dont-say

    She doesn't mention that helping DN put on her suit is allowed. image

    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • evmoevmo San FranciscoAdmin
    Let's start with what we know:

    A couple days ago, Diana Nyad entered the water west of Havana, Cuba. 53 hours later, she walked ashore in Key West.
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    #average speed 110/53=2,07 mi/h -> 3,34km/h

    #7h30m without feedings
    Monday, 7:30 a.m., Swim time: 46:31
    When the whistle blew for Diana’s first feeding stop since before midnight http://www.diananyad.com/blog/doctor-report-715am

    #she was touched. helped into a suit. greased by others. fed sustenance directly into her mouth

    #she used a streamer
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • bobswimsbobswims Charter Member
    edited September 2013
    Niek said:
    And this was deep into the swim. No food, no electrolytes, no water? They report that she did this because she wanted to keep moving to prevent getting cold(er). At least for me, not feeding for 7 1/2 hours after I had swam more than 24 hours would just lead me to getting colder. Of all of the things I've read this is the one that stands out the most. The only time I go without eating and drinking for 7 1/2 is when I am sleeping. But if she pulled it off, kudos to her.
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    Does anyone knows how fast the currents pushed DN north?
    What was the additional speed added to her own?
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    How is it possible to swim so straight a course with the strong Gulf current?
    The Navigator explains on Youtube how they steer a lot towards the west to compensate for the current. How is it possible that her north bound speed is still so fast? 2 mph
    http://omgsrv1.meas.ncsu.edu:8080/ocean-circulation
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • timsroottimsroot Member
    edited September 2013
    Niek said:

    youtube.com/watch?v=ygvDnljbnts

    With cries in the background of "watch the streamer" - ugh.
  • Voyager made a quick crossing in about 12 hours for the purpose of checking currents, water temps and conditions that Diana will encounter on her swim back to Key West.
    http://www.diananyad.com/blog/voyager-departs-cuba
    That's only 4.4 times faster the DN
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • evmo said:

    Splitting these off, out of respect for @MvG's sentiment.

    :-) He he he much appreciated this respect for my feelings Evan. In fact, we're not so far apart on the need for questions to be clarified - see my latest comment under the other thread 'Diana Nyad's epic swim'. It's the vitriol in some contributions that bothered me.

    If anybody wants to put together a list of simple straightforward questions put respectfully to DN and her team directly (as opposed to flying all over the place on various online forums), not assuming cheating but simply requesting technical clarifications, then I wouldn't be against that.
  • dc_in_sfdc_in_sf San FranciscoMember

    For anyone who is questioning Nyad's ability to cross in 53 hours, consider not only that she was with the current, but that her time only averages 1:52 per 100 meters. That is incredibly slow! That is even slower considering she was traveling WITH the current. Unbelievably slow. So slow one has to question whether to call it swimming. So the speed is NOT a question.

    dang nabbit @Proswimmer, I've been telling my friends I spent 4 hours "swimming" this past weekend, but since my pace was 2:00 per 100m apparently I need a new verb, help a fellow out with that would you?
    http://notdrowningswimming.com - open water adventures of a very ordinary swimmer
  • For anyone who is questioning Nyad's ability to cross in 53 hours, consider not only that she was with the current, but that her time only averages 1:52 per 100 meters. That is incredibly slow! That is even slower considering she was traveling WITH the current. Unbelievably slow. So slow one has to question whether to call it swimming. So the speed is NOT a question.

    Wow! I have to say I was pretty pleased with my EC swim - but, taking into account distance actually covered and speed per 100 - I averaged about 1:50/100. Now...come to find out I was so slow it may not have qualified as actual swimming. Certainly felt like swimming.

  • mjstaplesmjstaples Atlanta, GA, USMember
    May be just me 1:52/100 meters may seem "slow" for an hour or two swim but seems incredibly fast for a swim of this distance and length of time
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    All her previous attempts she expected to do it in 70 hours.
    Could she have been that wrong with the calculations then? 25% difference?

    @ProSwimmer but that her time only averages 1:52 per 100 meters.

    Can you show the mathematics for that?

    If we take 103 miles I come to
    103x1.609/53/60x1000=52 meters per minute and that's
    50/52x60x2=115 sec for 100 meters

    If we take 112 miles I come to 106 sec/100 m
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • malinakamalinaka Seattle, WACharter Member
    Tonight I got home from work late and set myself up to watch some more Downton Abbey, but first wanted to check in on the brewing controversy - it's the most entertainment I've gotten from DN's swim. I find it entertaining because I have really been excited to read those blog posts many of you are probably writing right now explaining how the currents don't line up, and giving me new insight into planning my next swim. But I'm sick of waiting, and now Carson and Lady Mary will have to do the waiting while I jump into this.

    Google Earth, isn't that always the first step? And a few assumptions: 1.8mph average swim speed (in zero current, not velocity made good); 53 hours; starting and ending points. Looking at this as a vector of resolution 53 hours, here's what I drew: an arc (white, green) with r=95.4 miles (1.8*53). Then a vector between that arc and the end point at a reasonable angle (red), and then connected them with the resultant (cyan).

    image
    This resultant increases the apparent speed from a 2:04/100m pace to a 1:49/100m pace, or an increase in 0.15mph, by the way.

    What do I get out of this? Certainly not proof of anything. But it does ruin the fun I was having watching this drama play out.

    Again, I'm NOT saying that this is what Nyad did, but merely pointing out that her feat seems plausible based on some basic math. Assuming an average 0.49kt current heading in the general direction of ENE over the course of her swim doesn't sound unreasonable. I don't know...it just isn't so obvious to me anymore that this is controversial.

    And now it is way past my bedtime, and I'll have to wait until tomorrow to find out what Matthew will do. Hrrmph.
    I don't wear a wetsuit; it gives the ocean a sporting chance.
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    The Night Train Swimmers did 228 miles in 100-hour 29-minutes.
    meaning they did 103 mi in 46.5 hours. DN only took 6.5 hours more all by her self.

    Those Night Train Swimmers are seemingly a bunch of wimps.
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • IronMikeIronMike Bishkek, KyrgyzstanCharter Member
    Yes, "Pro" swimmer, but add in her feed stops of 12 min long, and those stops where her crew would clothe her and put her make-up on...but I guess you're right since she made up all that time on night two what with not needing water or feed for 7+ hours.
  • http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/diana-nyad-press-conference-2013-swimmer-63-discusses-20144167 around 28:40 Diana herself says: "It's important that no one touch me or you're done you're disqualified"

    So what about the direct in the mouth feeding as seen on http://www.diananyad.com/blog/first-feeding
    or all the touching by the doctors http://www.diananyad.com/blog/doctor-090113-830am
    or all the helping in the suit http://www.diananyad.com/blog/130901-feeding-stop-6pm
    or Dr. Angel Yanagihara appling "sting-stopper" to the swimmer's face (see video). http://www.diananyad.com/blog/jelly-strategy
    or “Boat. I’m hitting the boat,” she says.
    In the true spirit of teamwork and protection, shark diver Jason, who is scouting the area around Diana for jellyfish and sharks, immediately gets between Diana and the boat. “You’ll hit me, Diana, you won’t hit the boat,” he says.
    http://www.diananyad.com/blog/update-9pm-130901
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • I am so confused as to not eating for 7 plus hours. Speaking from experience there is no possible way to have swam for a full day then not eat for this amount of time. No way. During my 25 hour swim I was unable to eat for the last 3 hours. I ended up in the hospital because my body began to eat the protein from my muscles clogging my kidneys. It can not be done. The body will shut down. Fact..... At this point in the swim the body is already very depleted. She was most likely burning around 600 calories an hour and taking in 300. Then to stop eating. Again no way. Either it was not communicated correctly or ..... This past weekend I was part of a swim sanctioned by the SBCSA. An impartial observer was with us. He diligently recorded everything that went on during the swim from feedings to ocean conditions. The log was extremely detailed. The importance of this is crucial. When we look back at this swim there will be a record of everything. Question - Was there an official impartial observer on board? If so lets see the log.
  • evmoevmo San FranciscoAdmin
    edited September 2013
    I scraped all the data I could find from her blog on time & distance. The last column shows her speed on each segment of the swim.


    date time elapsed segment total segment segment
    of day time time dist dist mph
    -------------------------------------------------------
    8/31 1415 4:46 4:46 7.05 7.05 1.48
    1844 9:01 4:15 11.85 4.8 1.13
    9/1 0859 24:00 14:15 38.18 26.33 1.85
    1200 27:01 3:01 47.61 9.53 3.16
    1600 31:01 4:00 63.25 15.64 3.91
    2130 36:31 5:30 80.38 17.13 3.11
    9/2 0200 42:01 5:30 93.84 13.46 2.45
    0730 47:31 5:30 103.86 10.02 1.82
    1606 52:54 5:23 110.36 6.50 1.21
  • JBirrrdJBirrrd Member
    edited September 2013
    Note to self:
    When battling a cross current, just make sure I have a support boat w/ gps that knows where it's going. Brilliant.

  • Who is ProSwimmer? Registered an anonymous acct on Sept 3 and speaks with authority about speed and GPS navigation in open water. Your comments are duly noted. Pool swimmer? Swimmer at all? Mole?
    It is a given that Diana Nyad did not follow conventional marathon swimming rules. I am fine with calling this attempt an adventure swim or whatever. I was a fan. I wanted to see her succeed. But now I too am conflicted.
    Among the many inconsistencies I have read and seen in video footage, I must disagree with ProSwimmer. The speed (nice work Evan), as well as several updates regarding feeds (a 12 min. feed after first 1 ½ hr of swimming and that stoic 7 ½ hour fast Saturday night) are the glaring red flags that make me question the validity of this swim. Diana is a seasoned swimmer. She knew that this historic swim would be publicized world-wide and scrutinized by others in the open water community. And yet she chose a support team and observers who obviously did not know how implausible it would sound to post some of the updates they did. C’mon. Maybe that stuff would go right over a non-swimmers‘ head, but anyone with minimal open water experience should be at least a little bit skeptical.
    The general public wants to believe this phenomenal success story of perseverance and overcoming enormous odds. The media is all too happy to package this feel-good story of the year and deliver it to the world. But one woman’s dream should not supersede the dreams of others. Be assured I will not be attempting this swim ever, but out of respect to those who have or will in the future, Diana and her team need to clarify exactly how this amazing feat was accomplished. I am patiently waiting for the never give up your dreams media blitz to end. Then I am confident that somebody in the mainstream media will start asking the tough questions and the facts will surface. Patience….
  • JBirrrd said:

    Diana is a seasoned swimmer. She knew that this historic swim would be publicized world-wide and scrutinized by others in the open water community. And yet she chose a support team and observers who obviously did not know how implausible it would sound to post some of the updates they did. C’mon. Maybe that stuff would go right over a non-swimmers‘ head, but anyone with minimal open water experience should be at least a little bit skeptical.

    Related to your point, I think it's also important to remember that she has a journalism background, and has been credited as a contributor to NPR. Self promotion isn't entirely bad, but I have trouble with spinning this much of a story without highlighting some of the...inconsistencies.

  • IronMikeIronMike Bishkek, KyrgyzstanCharter Member
    evmo said:



    date time elapsed segment total segment segment
    of day time time dist dist mph
    -------------------------------------------------------
    8/31 1415 4:46 4:46 7.05 7.05 1.48
    1844 9:01 4:15 11.85 4.8 1.13
    9/1 1606 52:54 5:23 110.36 6.50 1.21
    I think I found the segments she might have actually swum. I adjusted your chart above, @evmo. ;)
  • malinakamalinaka Seattle, WACharter Member
    @evmo That's a helpful clue! I'd like to try to recalculate her route and see if I can get any, some, all, or none of her numbers to work out. An observers report would sure be helpful, but then it wouldn't be quite the same mystery, right?

    As a community, we owe it to ourselves to do this exercise. To do it long hand, and with pretty pictures. At the end we'll either have some solid evidence with which to declare fraud, or we'll have the inner workings of an amazing feat of navigation.
    I don't wear a wetsuit; it gives the ocean a sporting chance.
  • david_barradavid_barra Charter Member
    malinaka said:

    @evmo That's a helpful clue! I'd like to try to recalculate her route and see if I can get any, some, all, or none of her numbers to work out. An observers report would sure be helpful, but then it wouldn't be quite the same mystery, right?

    As a community, we owe it to ourselves to do this exercise. To do it long hand, and with pretty pictures. At the end we'll either have some solid evidence with which to declare fraud, or we'll have the inner workings of an amazing feat of navigation.

    Thanks smart guys (if only I was as smart as I look...)
    Not to add to your homework assignment, but could you work up the same for Suzie Marony's caged swim for comparison? (as long as you're not doin' nuthin')
    ...anything worth doing is worth overdoing.
  • I don't like this thread. Knowing the majority of MSF members opinions on Diana have been negative due to her either breaking establish EC rules and developing or inventing her own rules , why didn't an observer from MSF or CSA ask be invited along? Was there nobody on Diana's crew that MSF would believe? It is very clear if her swim is judged under EC rules, then it was a failure. But she still swam a fantastic swim. (better than if it were a wetsuit and fins swim). However, because of the extreme value of this swim (which should go down in history as one of the greatest ever swims), I would expect it to have the greatest degree of transparency, especially to avoid 'fraud' type remarks. I guess in a few days, Diana can be interviewed to clarify exactly how she conducted her swim.
  • Is this attempt, effort, swim(?) going to be Guiness World Record? I thought records had to be verified.... and unequivocable.... Which this is most certainly not....
    I love swimming
    www.suziedodsswimcoaching.com
  • For a Guiness World record, you have to apply to Guiness before your event. They will usually expect the event to be done in accordance with the rules of the governing bodies and will expect the governing bodies observers to ratify a success. Many events (my World Record EC first backstroke swim) won't interest them, they said because the Channel had already been swum. I expect they would say the Cuba swim had already been done too. Although the mileage of Diana's swim might be a new open water distance record, although easily beaten by downstream river swims.
  • loneswimmerloneswimmer Admin
    edited September 2013
    I think we all disagree with @proswimmer. I think we may all wonder about the experience that drives such assertions made as:
    Staying awake and continuing to swim for that long is pretty incredible, but the speed is not.
    Paul Newsome measures his sustained marathon non-current assisted speed at 1:45 to 1:50 per 100m but his pool threshold speed at 1:16/1:20 per 100m. Handy having that on his blog. There will be faster swimmers but not that many. Trent Grimsey's (an actual Pro) 100m rate was 1:12 per 100m on the sprint into the Cap and he was World Number 1. Also handy having that.

    Staying awake isn't a problem in water while sustaining physical effort. (I once happened on a troll who claimed he could sleep while swimming but I've never heard of anyone falling asleep, which is different from being exhausted).

    The physiological limiting factors, all the other usual DN nonsense aside, are salt mouth, ability to keep turning arms over, and a steady energy supply.
    And anyone questioning how one swims straight???? Are you kidding me? Just watch the boat. It has a GPS. It's not that hard. Currents don't really play a role since the boat knows where it is going.
    Almost every English Channel, North Channel, Tsugaru Channel, Cook Strait etc, swimmer ... ever... knows that the boat can go against or across the tidal current but a swimmer can't. That's what makes it, you know, hard. If it was that easy swimmers could just aim straight for the Cap when it appears. Such a statement shows a considerable lack of understanding of tidal currents amongst other things. That's probably the most inaccurate statement outside a Diana Nyad Tweet..

    *

    I'd pretty much decided I wasn't going to write any more on Nyad ever, after all the previous articles I'd written and most especially after what I called the Two Golden Rules:

    1. The swimmer/organisation must fully disclose** all the rules and criteria of the swim beforehand.
    2. If the swim is be recognised somehow, then the swim must have fully Independent Observation for Verification that the swim meets these stated rules and the participants must be fully cognizant of all the rules, especially those which relate to Invalidation of a swim.


    I'd started from initially being a fan to being utterly disbelieving of anything. To nail my colours up, I'm the far extreme of not believing anything she says or does. However...I think it's obviously good for her own psyche that she's conquered her personal dragon regardless of the fact that I and any others personally disbelieve her. The fact that I don't believe her doesn't mean I want her to be unhappy.

    An anecdote: Every time she does something I pick up incoming search engine terms. For the first time in almost four years of loneswimmer.com the search items related to her coming into the site have changed and now include all the following terms, (and I am taking these from the top as they appeared due to frequency):

    diana nyad cheated This was the first negative and highest of the search terms with a negative spin to appear. The three higher were all tracker related. This one was one-third of the highest general or positive term. All are exactly as they came in, typos included.
    diana nyad swim rules
    nyad assisted swim
    diana nyad rules
    is nyad 2013 swim a real marathon
    diana nyad stage rules for marathon swimming
    was nyad swim a true marathon
    nyad "touch the boat"
    diana nyad annoying
    dian nyad cheated
    what are the guidelines for the diana nyad cuba to florida swim rules
    rules of diana nyad swim
    rules nyad open water swim
    diana nyad can she hold on to the boat
    diana nyad english channel rules
    diana nyad swim channel rules

    With multiple hits on all except the last few, that's a significant change, having never received any similar previously, even last year.

    Google autocorrect is as always responsible for multiples of the same unwieldy phrases, once one person picks inputs something, it becomes a template for further queries.

    What this demonstrates is that unlike last or previous years, we as a community are, to whatever small extent, being heard, and people are now asking questions where they didn't previously.

    This community can take pride in not being blind & unquestioning.

    If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck and has a previous mugshot of being an actual duck, then it's, you know, Lance Armstrong.
    http://www.loneswimmer.com
    More ocean than man
  • I just found this clipping from a Boca Raton newspaper about Susie Maroney's crossing (courtesy of google) that was pretty interesting . Apparently, her swim raised a nearly identical questions. She expected to take about 50 hours but did it in roughly half that time (article didn't provide a number). She and her crew claimed she got huge boost from the current, though former crew members from her previous attempt accused her of hanging on to the cage.

    http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1291&dat=19970514&id=QEFUAAAAIBAJ&sjid=Uo4DAAAAIBAJ&pg=3717,3756021

  • IronMikeIronMike Bishkek, KyrgyzstanCharter Member
    Well, one good thing from all this. Perhaps with her personal demon conquered, we're done hearing from her?
  • If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck and has a previous mugshot of being an actual duck, then its, you know, Lance Armstrong.

    :))
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • If staying warm is your primary objective - so much so that you are willing to forgo food for hours - a small detail like wearing a swim cap should be very high on the priority list.
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    AUG 31 Posted 2:27pm especially when our fleet is traveling only about 1 mph http://www.diananyad.com/blog/close-call-rusty-boat

    Swim Time: 31 Hours She is still swimming strongly at her typical training speed of 1.5 to 1.6 and @evmo calculated segmented 3.91 mph.
    Meaning the current pushes her north with 3.91-1.6= 2.21 mph?
    http://omgsrv1.meas.ncsu.edu:8080/ocean-circulation/ has the flow almost east to west and hardly north.
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • mpfmarkmpfmark Teesside England Charter Member
    This whole subject frustrates me as to why she cannot come clean. All I will say is.
    Lance was a hero. She for me is in the same bracket
    It takes away from the likes of Wendy T and Marcy M and their recent 2 way EC swims let alone the likes of Phils 3 way (amongst others) that's without even going into the Kevin /Alison swims
    Do me a favour
    Tell us what really happened and stop the speculation or stop this circus
  • mpfmarkmpfmark Teesside England Charter Member
    Despite being a charter member, It's taken 13 months for me to come back and comment on a thread. Enough said
  • bobswimsbobswims Charter Member
    edited September 2013
    To add a bit of levity

  • If ever we get to see the 'independent' observers reports I hope those observers have also noted which boat they were on. In the blog I read that observers aren't at all times on the main vessel. http://www.diananyad.com/blog/update-127am-090213
    Why they ad the word independent together with observer I don't know. Shouldn't an observer always be independent and neutral?
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • I wish to congratulate Diana for making the world believe that she did the swim.

    She is a media celeb and should stay into that world. Marathon swimming is a total different league, in my humble opinion, and should not mixed with that.

    I do recall that she used to get in and out of the water in previous attempts so I am inclined to think that she did the same this time, not to mention potentially being towed by one of the support vessels. From what I read above, I have even more reasons to believe that this happened.

    It is probably just a matter of time until the truth surfaces and I look forward to that. Meanwhile, I personally withhold any appreciation for this endeavour
  • NiekNiek Member
    edited September 2013
    Two articles that makes it all more interesting:

    Widow Of Columbus Man Says He Completed Cuba To Florida Swim First.
    Walter Poenisch set out from Havana on July 11, 1978. He completed the 128.8 mile swim in 34 hours and 15 minutes. He used a shark cage and took breaks while fighting multiple jellyfish stings. http://www.nbc4i.com/story/23336843/widow-of-columbus-man-says-he-completed-cuba-to-florida-swim-first

    Swimming With Sharks
    Was Diana Nyad really at risk of being bitten during her historic swim?......................But Diana Nyad is still awesome, right? Large sharks that have been associated with serious bites are certainly found on Nyad’s route. However, she wasn’t really at much risk of being bitten. Shark populations are rapidly declining in the Caribbean, shark bites are extremely rare, and there hasn’t been a fatal shark bite in the region since before Nyad was born. Regardless of her risk of being bitten by a shark, though, swimming for more than two straight days is still extremely impressive.
    http://www.slate.com/articles/health_and_science/science/2013/09/diana_nyad_shark_swim_how_dangerous_are_the_sharks_between_cuba_and_florida.html
    http://openwaterswimming.eu - Cold, wind, waves, sunburn, currents, jellyfish and flotsam! Hop in and join the fun!
  • From DN's press conference yesterday...

    "She even admitted, to the chagrin of her friend, trainer and business partner Bonnie Stoll, that she rooted for fellow endurance swimmer Chloe McCardell to fail in her attempt earlier this year and thought some local people in Key West were traitors for working with McCardell and on Penny Palfrey’s attempt in 2012."

    DN loves to talk. I believe the more she talks, the more we will learn.
  • It is interesting that Nyad is facing the same skepticism that Walter Poenisch dealt with back in 1978.

    Granted Poenisch used a snorkel, flippers and a shark cage made of chicken wire, but when he completed his 125 mile swim from Cuba to Marathon Key he was called a "gimmick and a cheat".

    Can you guess who made those statements?

    http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=VWFQAAAAIBAJ&sjid=kVgDAAAAIBAJ&pg=2916,3258841&dq=walter+poenisch&hl=en
  • Jamie said:

    I am so confused as to not eating for 7 plus hours. Speaking from experience there is no possible way to have swam for a full day then not eat for this amount of time. No way. During my 25 hour swim I was unable to eat for the last 3 hours. I ended up in the hospital because my body began to eat the protein from my muscles clogging my kidneys. It can not be done. The body will shut down. Fact..... At this point in the swim the body is already very depleted. She was most likely burning around 600 calories an hour and taking in 300. Then to stop eating. Again no way. Either it was not communicated correctly or ..... This past weekend I was part of a swim sanctioned by the SBCSA. An impartial observer was with us. He diligently recorded everything that went on during the swim from feedings to ocean conditions. The log was extremely detailed. The importance of this is crucial. When we look back at this swim there will be a record of everything. Question - Was there an official impartial observer on board? If so lets see the log.

    She would've been hallucinating as badly as a good portion of the crowd at Woodstock.
    Lactate is for wimps.
  • IronMikeIronMike Bishkek, KyrgyzstanCharter Member
    @gregoc, interesting that she calls Poenisch not a legal marathon swimmer. Granted, he's not, having worn flippers, but funny that she's saying that when she was waiting for her shark cage to be built.
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